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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all I have me a 1951 Willys Pickup truck. I've done ripped it off the frame & had a new one made of cross section steel that is 4.5 square inches & the rail hiegth is 6.375" tall. It was all made to accept 73-87 Chevy suspension. All I know is I want it tall. I've got a SRW 1 ton Coporate 14 Bolt rear that is brand new. I'm currently looking for a Dana 60 front. Will this be able to hold 10-12 inches of lift fine? What sizes of tires do ya'll think is possible with 10-12" of lift? I know it is ind of hard to tell since it is a different body, also the new frame should have about 1" of lift itself, due to the heigth. Finally what is a good brand of suspension lift to go with? I found a pretty good price on some 12" leaf springs on Ebay. They were made by Competition Springs. Anyone heard of them.

I look foward to hearing some info from ya'll & be sure say anything you would do. :thumb:
 

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Those 12" springs will probably net you about 17" of lift in the front and mebbee about 21" in the rear.

The way I figure it is the 12" spring will most likely be sitting on top of you new axles and that will give you a spring-over lift as well as the leaf spring lift. The spring over is probably good for 5" thus the 17" number for the front. On the rear GM's had that cute little inverted rear shackle that you probably don't have on your new frame. This means your rear spring shackle will be pointing down not up, and this will move the rear eye of your rear spring 6-8" away from its stock location. Thus the 21" in the rear. Then you add on half the height gain of your new tires. Lets say you run 44"s, stock is about 28" so you would add another 8" of altitude with the rubber.

That would put you at 25-29" of total lift. While that would look cool in the driveway I hope your not short or fat cause your door sill would be 43-47" off the ground. Or about where your door handle is now. Now the D60 is a good front axle and would handle 44"s if you aren't insane with the stupid pedal. You would have to go with a crossover High-steering setup which isn't cheap, but the only safe way to do it if you're going to drive it on the road. If you are making an off-road only vehicle then full hydraulic would be the ticket. You're only problem with fitting big tires is the rear fenders, but they sit outside the bed so they can easily be replaced with some custom fenders that look stockish, but give you a lot more room.






Now for my opinion. Unless you are just making a mud truck then don't freakin do it man. That much lift is just silly :rolleyes: tell us what you want to do with this truck and we can probably give you some pretty good ideas. If you want a trail rig, a mudder, rock crawler, or a daily driver/weekend warrior we can help. If you just want a tall truck I can't help you there.

If it were my truck and I had the funds I would try to build it around some 37-40" MT's. This could probably be done with just a spring over on stock height GM springs in the rear and 4" lift springs in the front to compensate for the shackle flip you already probably have in the rear. The front axle would have to be moved forward to keep the tire out of the fender, and the rear fenders would be custom built units to fit around the new meats. This would be a very functional height and drivetrain package.
 

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Excellent synopsis of the situation. I totally agree. I have owned and built up 5 or 6 Willys trucks and wagons over the years and worked on dozens of them. I know every nut and bolt on them, which is kind of twisted I know. Blast to look at... fun to drive if they are built right, but that much lift will require rope ladders and parachutes.

I am curious what you are wanting to do with it too.

Let us know so we can feed our sickness.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow...... thanks for the info you know your stuff. As far as what I'm wanting to do with it is, make it into a plain simple mud truck. I do want it safe for on road driving, though it will surely not be my daily driver. I DON'T want it to be one of those pretty trucks that sits way up there, but can't do BS off-road. Tire fitment in the rear shouldn't be a problem as I'm using a flatbed for it. Now I would have thought I could get bigger tires than 44" with 12" of lift.

Let me show you a pic of how I would like it to look. The 4th pic on the left of the 2nd Gen Dodge Ram. That is what I was looking at. What would this require?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/MILI...008QQitemZ180047794916QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWDVW
 

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I know a guy that has those tires on an FJ40. Thing is freaking huge!
 

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The power you need to turn those tires in the mud, will shatter a dana 60. If those are what you are looking to run on a mud truck, you better go find some rockwells.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I don't know I didn't really think the dana 60 couldn't handle that power. However I am now looking into Rockwells & they aren't priced bad niether.
 

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I' ve had a hand in building three trucks useing those tires. The first truck used a dana 60 and the first time in in the mud the 60 let go. The combination of the weight and size of the 52's are just to much for a 60. Save yourself some money and frustration and go with the rockwells. Thats not to say you wont ever break the rockwells, it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I' ve had a hand in building three trucks useing those tires. The first truck used a dana 60 and the first time in in the mud the 60 let go. The combination of the weight and size of the 52's are just to much for a 60. Save yourself some money and frustration and go with the rockwells. Thats not to say you wont ever break the rockwells, it happens.
Ok, I did a little reading on that & seems your right.
 

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Yup you are now totally out my realm of experience and knowledge. I generally don't care for mud, to much work to clean up afterwards, but I'm going to forge ahead with more free advice.

First, buy the tires you want to run before buying any suspension parts, or make some cardboard templates of the tires and use those to mock ride height.

Second I would still try to keep it as low as possible. Bouncing around in ruts at high speed is not as much fun when you spend most of your time on your side. Move the front axle forward to clear the rear of the fenders.

Third, check out Peterson's 4Wheel and Offroad magazine, three years back or so they put those michelins on a Ford Super Duty with about 4" of lift and some generous trimming. A web search for Ultimate Super Duty may be helpful. I think they broke their D60, and it wasn't even a high horse mud monster, nothing to sneeze at, but no monster.

There's enough info out there to write several books on just building rigs for mudding. So let google be your friend, and search through some of the old mud race posts. There's some pretty good power and suspension tech in there.

If you need a motor to trun those suckers check out baddog's for sale posts.
 

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I'm in the same boat but its my first project in the 4*4 world and my wills truck is a 61 .I think I'm only going for 33s but I have no clue where to start. When it comes to hot rods I'm fin but suspensions an reared I'm lost . Please help me
 

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For stability lower is better! I'm Into rock crawling so my needs are a bit different than the mud..... I know there is a guy with a willys who runs in the mud.............
 
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